Maze Layout

This page was last updated on 20th April 2007.


Classification

Type Details Mazes
Tangential-radial Single standard Guingamp
Double standard Wing
Alkborough
Alkborough Church
Hilton (variant)
Whitfield Place (variant)
Breamore
St. Mary Redcliffe
Victoria Park
Chartres
St. Quentin
Amiens
Poitiers (variant)
Mirepoix (variant)
Sélestat
Lucca
Cologne
Maastricht
Triple standard Saffron Walden
¼,¼,3(½,¼), ¼,1,¼,¼,½,½,1, ½,¼,½,¾,¼,¼; I3,2O,2I,2O,8I,4O,2I,I3. Winchester
2(1,¼,¼,½,¼, ½,¼,½,¼,¼,1); I5,3O,2I,2O,2I,O3,I5,3I,2O,2I,2O,I3,I. Bayeux
¼,¼,2(½,¼,¾),¼,¼, 3(½,¼),3(¼); I7,2O,2I,6O,2I,2O,4I,I3. Ravenna
4(9(¼)+); I9,3(2(O3,I,I,O3),I8),2(O,O3),I,2(I,I3)). Piadena
10(1); I7,O5,I3,2O,I3,O5,I7,I,O9. Hannover
11(1); 2(I5,O3,2I,O3,I5). Graitschen (variant)
Steigra
Cartesian cruciform Chambéry
St. Omer
Ghent
Other Ely

Types

Tangential-radial

Mazes belonging to this type have the following features.

Cartesian cruciform

Mazes belonging to this type have the following features.

Details

I have used the following four-part notation to describe tangential-radial layouts. (However, in the classification on this page, I have omitted the first and fourth parts.)

The cartesian cruciform layout does not lend itself to this sort of analysis.

The standard layout

As the classification above shows, the double clockwise standard is by far the most common common layout. Shorn of all ornament it looks like this (the cardinal points are arbitrary).

What, if anything, is special about this design? If you imagine cutting it along a straight line from the entrance to the centre (the red line in the diagram above), and then stretching out the resulting shape into a rectangle, you will transform it into the following.

This design has three noteworthy features.

The general formula for the second and third parts of an n-fold standard layout is:


Back to maze index